fastcompany:

3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

Read More>

This is a cool piece about how art, author’s craft, and culture come together to make something culturally relevant. This is also notable commentary on how once it hits social media, it’s hard to hold on to…and maybe that’s the purpose.

fastcompany:

3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

Read More>

This is a cool piece about how art, author’s craft, and culture come together to make something culturally relevant. This is also notable commentary on how once it hits social media, it’s hard to hold on to…and maybe that’s the purpose.

thebicker:

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011.  García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.


This infographic only shows the data for black and white students, but the stats are almost identical for Hispanic students.

Interesting graphic. The article from the Washington Post is also a worthy read.

thebicker:

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011. García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.

This infographic only shows the data for black and white students, but the stats are almost identical for Hispanic students.

Interesting graphic. The article from the Washington Post is also a worthy read.

(via little-miss-student-teacher)

inlovewiththeflow:

hiphopisvintage:

My favorite picture/piece of artwork by far.

I love this so damn much

This is really good stuff. I love the graffiti. I love the patience of the narrative. I hope that this doesn’t turn out to be fake.

(via libby-lynn)

99percentinvisible:

The curtains are drawn. Some light comes through, casting a small glow on the top left of the air conditioner. It’s daytime. The wall is an undecorated slab of beige. That is the American room.”

What an incredible and enjoyable essay. The rhetoric of the YouTube room. Great stuff. Good analysis, decent research, completely relevant deconstruction of something we all have seen. Highly recommend.

jtotheizzoe:

teded:

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout.
From the TED-Ed lesson How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins
Animation by Sharon Colman Graham

Shred that guitar, toot that horn, rattle those keys… it’s good fer yer neurons!

Interesting video. It’s a good primer on neuroscience and music. A great book on the topic is This is your Brain on Music. As a primer here are two articles on the neurology of freestyle rap and jazz improvisation.

jtotheizzoe:

teded:

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout.

From the TED-Ed lesson How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

Animation by Sharon Colman Graham

Shred that guitar, toot that horn, rattle those keys… it’s good fer yer neurons!

Interesting video. It’s a good primer on neuroscience and music. A great book on the topic is This is your Brain on Music. As a primer here are two articles on the neurology of freestyle rap and jazz improvisation.

Tags: music brain

fastcompany:

Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.
Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.
Read More>

This has to be useful to somebody.

fastcompany:

Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.

Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.

Read More>

This has to be useful to somebody.

The Annotation project

Hello everybody.

Ever since I read Jonathan Safran Foer’s article Emptinessabout his fascination and promise of the empty page, I’ve been wondering about my own collections concerning writing. I collect books. I collect model student papers, but most of this stuff was in my hand. Well, a couple of years ago, I began giving away framed pages of my annotations to friends. I would consider the friend, find a book that I’ve read that I thought they might like or made me think of them, check the text for annotations, photocopy the passage, frame it and give the annotated page as a gift.

As I kept making more gifts, people kept commenting on how they enjoyed them.

Throughout my different living spaces, I would put up annotations or frame favorite pages of books. Over time, using the Foer as a model, I wrote some of my favorite authors and asked if they wanted to contribute a photocopied-annotated manuscript page or a photocopy of their reading to the wall. Some replied, while others only read and wrote electronically.

Every once in a while, I would take one or two up to school to show students. They were fascinated. It was then I realized how little modeling they had of annotations in the process of reading or writing. Yes, they’d seen me do it, but that was about it. So when it was appropriate, I would show annotations from readers/ writers from Obama, Coppola, and whatever else I could find on-line. And while they thought it was cool, the students didn’t seem to respond the same way to the screen as they did when they saw them in a frame. The framing provided it’s own rhetoric. It told the students that writing and the notes are important of our process as readers, writers, and persons.

And finally the invitation. If you would like to contribute an annotated page of your reading or notes you’ve made on a manuscript (photocopied or original), feel free to get in touch. I’m looking to put a collection together of physical copies of annotations in all shapes and sizes.

Cheers.

On June 12, three Israeli teenagers were kidnapped while hitchhiking home together from their West Bank yeshivas. They were murdered—most likely within hours of being taken—and, eighteen days later, after an extensive search, their bodies were discovered under some rocks in a field near Hebron. Israel mourned, and raged. Emerging from a cabinet meeting convened just after the corpses were found, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expressed his condolences to the families and quoted the great modernist Hebrew poet Hayim Nahman Bialik: “Vengeance … for the blood of a small child, / Satan has not yet created.” He went on in his own words: “Hamas is responsible—and Hamas will pay.” For good measure, the Prime Minister’s office tweeted the lines as well.

As anyone who hasn’t lived atop a column in the Congo for the past seven weeks knows, a series of violent, retaliatory acts followed. Israel carried out mass arrests on the West Bank, killing six in the process; a Palestinian teenager was beaten and burned alive by a group of Jews; throngs of Palestinians destroyed tracks and stations on the Jerusalem light-rail line; Jewish gangs shouting “Death to the Arabs!” rampaged through Jerusalem in search of victims—and found them; some thirty-five thousand Facebook users “liked” a page called “The People of Israel Demand Revenge”; Hamas fired rockets by the dozen into Israel from Gaza; Hamas officials warned that “the gates of hell” would open if Israel attacked in retaliation for the killings or the shelling.

On the night of July 7, the gates opened, even as they were being closed, when the Israel Defense Forces launched what it calls for export Operation Protective Edge. (A more literal translation of the operation’s catchy Hebrew name would be Firm Cliff—with “cliff,” according to the Hebrew equivalent of the OED, evoking in its primary definition the high place in the wilderness off of which a scapegoat is cast each year on the Day of Atonement. Words, as we know, have powers often lost on those who speak them.) After ten days of intensive air strikes, IDF ground troops entered the fray, ostensibly to destroy the tunnels where weapons were being stored and from which attacks were dispatched. But also in Israel’s sights, it seems, was the newly formed Fatah-Hamas unity government and a real-world partner for peace.

As I write on Wednesday evening, July 30, the “operation,” which is looking more and more like a war, has claimed the lives of more than 1,300 Palestinians—most of them civilians, and many of them children—and fifty-nine Israelis, three of whom were civilians. Some 6,500 people have been wounded on the Palestinian side, and several hundred on the Israeli, counting both combatants and civilians. Large swaths of Gaza lie in ruins. The Israeli air force has destroyed Gaza’s only power plant, knocking out the strip’s electricity and sewage. Food is spoiling; water is scarce; disease is rampant.

As I leave my 30’s I find myself more interested in geopolitics and world issues. I am by no means taking a side on this issue, I’m merely documenting what I’m reading and thinking about. I think it’s important for students to see teachers struggling with issues, doing research, and figuring out where they fit in the world. As such, this is one of the issues I’m dealing with, researching, and thinking about.

(Source: azspot, via kenyatta)

tetw:

by Gideon Lewis Kraus

Meet the man who gave autocorrect its personality

Interesting and fun read.


The chart illustrates a pattern that most of us probably do not find surprising. But the sheer chasm separating single white men from Black and Hispanic single women is still shocking to see visualized so clearly. Single white men have 438 times the assets as single Black women and 365 times that of single Hispanic women. As we can see, marriage is a huge determinant of wealth - but mainly if you’re not white, and especially if you’re a woman.
Note that the chart provides data for wealth with and without vehicles (in most cases, cars). Here I’ve referenced the latter statistic. As the report notes, owning a car is an important way to access more employment opportunities among other things. But that wealth is not easily accessible in dollar terms, which is highly relevant for the following reason. Great disparities of wealth not only have a huge impact on life opportunities and the prospects for wealth accumulation. They are hugely important factor in the precariousness of economic life experienced by different demographic groups.
At essentially zero net wealth, individuals are one job less, illness or major expense away from debt (often incurred at usurious rates) or even homelessness.

This would be good to use in the classroom to discuss the nature of the inequality. Perhaps I can use this as a means to start research.

The chart illustrates a pattern that most of us probably do not find surprising. But the sheer chasm separating single white men from Black and Hispanic single women is still shocking to see visualized so clearly. Single white men have 438 times the assets as single Black women and 365 times that of single Hispanic women. As we can see, marriage is a huge determinant of wealth - but mainly if you’re not white, and especially if you’re a woman.

Note that the chart provides data for wealth with and without vehicles (in most cases, cars). Here I’ve referenced the latter statistic. As the report notes, owning a car is an important way to access more employment opportunities among other things. But that wealth is not easily accessible in dollar terms, which is highly relevant for the following reason. Great disparities of wealth not only have a huge impact on life opportunities and the prospects for wealth accumulation. They are hugely important factor in the precariousness of economic life experienced by different demographic groups.

At essentially zero net wealth, individuals are one job less, illness or major expense away from debt (often incurred at usurious rates) or even homelessness.

This would be good to use in the classroom to discuss the nature of the inequality. Perhaps I can use this as a means to start research.

(Source: dish.andrewsullivan.com, via kenyatta)